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March 2014
Ryley Walker
"All Kinds Of You
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mp3

The debut album, All Kinds of You, from Ryley Walker is impressive in its thoughtful restraint and intimate sounds and lyrics. Walker has spent years in Chicago's noise scene, but this album is a near folk masterpiece. Walker shows skill in guitar playing, singing, and writing though the album. The album opens with the track that Walker is currently known for "The West Wind". It is a solemn journey that Walker present in a video last Fall. The production value of the album shines through on a track like "Twin Oaks pt. 1" where the sounds builds into a lush down home party complete with drums, strips, and guitar picking. All Kinds of You (Tompkins Square, April 15th) presents and old soul, a journeyman in the form of this talented 24 year old singer/songwriter.


This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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Black Girls Record Release Show!

Richmond’s beloved Black Girls started the year by announcing the impending release of their new album, Claire Sinclaire, with a video teaser.  Finally, you can pick up your first copy (and/or a limited edition cassette with bonus tracks) at the record release show at Balliceaux, in Richmond this Saturday, 3/8, where they will be joined by Sleepwalkers and DJ Rattan. Check out a new surfy instrumental B-side (not on the album) below. –Natan Press

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Eternal Summers to drop The Drop Beneath tomorrow!

Eternal Summers' greatly anticipated third album, The Drop Beneath, is being released tomorrow, March 4th (via Kanine Records). The trio from Roanoke have been working hard since the release of Correct Behavior in 2012, and have gained a dedicated following. The Drop Beneath promises to be only a slight departure from their previous work, featuring lusher tones and more input from their bass player (who was a new addition to the band for Correct Behavior). The album is already being streamed exclusively on Pandora, and you can listen to a featured track, Never Enough, below. The band is touring for the album, and you can see them locally at U Street Music Hall this Thursday, March 6th (with Cheatahs), before they join Pains of Being Pure at Heart for a tour of the south starting at Baltimore Popfest this Friday, 3/7, and then in Charlottesville, at The Southern, on 3/8. --Natan Press

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Interview with GEMS, the Deli's DC Area Emerging Artist of the Year.

GEMS expoloded onto the DC scene last year, winning the Deli's DC Area Emerging Artist of the Year in 2013 with almost all of the juror votes. Their chill sounds, the beautiful voice of Lindsay Pitts and solid production combine to give the local listener a band they can cheer for as GEMS speeds along towards national recognition. In this interview, we tried to find out how GEMS was able to do so much in such a short time, and how they developed their thoughtful style and professional work-ethic. You can catch GEMS tomorrow, March 1st (7pm, the early show), at U Street Music Hall as they head out on tour towards SXSW and beyond. Tour dates below: 

03.01.14 – U Street Music Hall – Washington, DC
03.06.14 - Majestic - Madison, WI
03.07.14 - Double Door - Chicago, IL
03.09.14 - The Orange Peel - Asheville, NC
03.11.14-03.16.14 – SXSW – Austin, TX
03.17.14 – Bronze Peacock Room – Houston, TX
03.19.14 – The Parish – Austin, TX
03.20.14 – House Of Blues – Dallas, TX
03.22.14 - Terminal West - Atlanta, GA
03.23.14 - Music Farm - Charleston, SC
03.25.14 - Music Hall of Williamsburg - Brooklyn, NY
03.27.14 - Sinclair - Boston, MA
03.29.14 – SAT - Montreal, QC
05.10.14 - Sweetlife Festival - Columbia, MD

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Interview with GEMS

- by Natan Press


GEMS expoloded onto the DC scene last year, winning the Deli's DC Area Emerging Artist of the Year in 2013 with almost all of the juror votes. Their solid production, chill sounds and the beautiful voice of Lindsay Pitts combine to give the local listener a band they can cheer for as GEMS speeds along towards national recognition. In this interview, we tried to find out how GEMS was able to do so much in such a short time, and how they developed their thoughtful style and professional work-ethic.
 

How did the band begin? What were your goals and aspirations in the beginning? Why start a band?

We've been doing music together for years. It's really the only thing I can imagine doing.

How did you develop your aesthetic (your sound, your imagery, your look)? Where does the name come from?

I think one way to be creative is to limit yourself. When you're making art, it's easy to want to do everything. We decided to work within certain constraints, I think it forces you to think outside the box a little.

Why singles, and not albums? We do all of our own production and mixing and everything. When we would finish a song we were into, I didn’t want to wait until we had a bunch of songs to share it with people. I wanted to share it right away so people could be a part of the process with us. We did put out an EP a few months ago, so we stored some songs up for that.

How has the internet and social media helped or hurt you? How have you taken advantage of it, and how has it affected your progress?

The internet is an amazing tool! Soundcloud is an awesome community of people sharing music they love. Sites like that have allowed our music to spread to people all over the world.

Who’s on your team? How did you find help (management, publicity) if you did? How do they help you? What have you been able to do on your own to help make your music a success?

We have a wonderful team. They came to us because of the hard work we did ourselves in the beginning. We held ourselves to a really high standard with the production and songwriting. I think it spoke to people and the music spread online.

How do you see GEMS progressing from here? What‘s next, both creatively and professionally?

Lots of touring, probably another EP and an album. And always challenging ourselves, working to get better every day.

 

 

will

 
 
 

 

GEMS
Medusa

 

 
 
 

The Strangest Places release debut album Premature Awakenings.

DC’s The Strangest Places is a new project by Chris Howard (with a little help from his friends). The first album, Premature Awakenings, is being released today after a successful Kickstarter campaign. The album is an exploration of mournful, fuzzy, low-fi indie-pop, with a surprisingly wide range of sound and tempo (including a cover of Robert Palmer’s Johnny and Mary). The songs are all meticulously crafted, and no two are put together exactly the same way, with a lot of effort put into the guitar sounds that are the centerpiece of most of the tracks. Check out the video for Could Someone below. --Natan Press

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Interview with Walk The Plank: Winner of the DC Area Deli's Best of 2013 Readers' Poll.

Walk the Plank won our Best of 2013 DC readers' poll, due to their ability to create a strong following in the DMV scene through an incredible DIY work ethic, and an adventurous take on the hardcore sound. They mix metal and punk in a satisfying onslaught of energy in show after show after show for two years. Hopefully this is just the beginning. In this interview, members of the band discuss what it takes to make it with a DIY mindset in the DMV. You can catch them in DC at DC9 on Tuesday, 3/11, or in Richmond at Strange Matter on Wednesday, 3/12 before they head to Texas for a number of SXSW showcases. --Natan Press

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  classifieds
 


Interview with 
Walk the Plank

- by Natan Press

Walk the Plank won our 2013 DC readers' poll, due to their ability to create a strong following in the DMV scene through an incredible DIY work ethic, and an adventurous take on the hardcore sound. They mix metal and punk in a satisfying onslaught of energy in show after show after show for two years. Hopefully this is just the beginning. In this interview, members of the band discuss what it takes to make it with a DIY mindset in the DMV. 

You guys play a lot. How many shows have you played? Why do you play so many shows? Is it just for fun or is it a professional strategy? How do you manage to do it?

Alex: Yeah it’s definitely a labor of love. We’ve played around 200 shows at this point I would say. As far as it being a professional strategy? I wouldn’t say that exactly. It’s more if you want to get your name out there, you have to get on the road and play. It’s definitely difficult as we all have full time jobs. It hasn’t stopped us though. I remember one tour we did a few years ago we all had trouble getting off work, so we sucked it up and ventured to each show each night after work and drove right back to be back for work in the morning. I think the furthest we went on the trip and back was Asbury Park, NJ and came right back and then went back out the next night for another 4 hour haul. Crazy in hindsight and probably wouldn’t do a tour in that manner again, but we didn’t want to cancel the shows just because we’ll lose a little bit of sleep.

Why hardcore? Are you trying to bring something back; bring something alive in D.C. Is simply your thing? What got you to start playing. What are your goals?

Ian: I grew up listening to punk and hardcore, as well as a lot of other genres. Despite our inspiration/aspirations, our goal is to have fun and to express ourselves positively and have the opportunity to say something. Ultimately it’s to seek inner peace and to see the world.

Troy: I don't think we limit ourselves to “Hardcore”, especially since I joined the band. If you have to pigeonhole us to a genre, I suppose that is a decent one to describe the music we create. We play what we play, and try to keep progressing and writing well-crafted songs. I've been obsessed/in love with music since I was about 3 or 4 years old. My goal is to keep creating music, and having fun, with people I respect and love for as long as I'm alive.

How is the D.C hardcore scene doing in general? Is it coming back? Did it never leave?

Ian: It’s quite diverse; there are a lot of talented musicians doing a lot of unique work. It has never left D.C., It has merely evolved.

Troy: Things are what they are. Seems to be a pretty decent bunch of folks in the DC/MD/VA underground music scene these days. Whether it left/came back is pretty subjective to the individual. You can't focus on whether it was better or worse 5, 10, 15, 20 years ago. It is what it is, and we're having fun being a part of it.

It seems like there are a number of new efforts to reinvigorate the DIY scene in the DC area. Can you talk about new things ( people, venues, studios, messages boards, etc.. .) that have been helpful to you and others recently?

Alex: It seems like it always comes in cycles. There will be a ton of things going on, tons of energy and effort from people to put on shows and tons of bands playing them. After a while people get busy, venues close, bands break up, and you have to wait for the next wave of people who want to take the torch and carry it on again. It happens all the time and its not a bad thing. I think its good! It keeps new blood coming in and it keeps it fresh and creative. Right now we are lucky its thriving in the area.

Ian: It’s definitely a matter of people caring. In terms of studios, we have had the pleasure to work with several talented producers in the DMV, and I feel as though each session has allowed us to grow as musicians.

D.C. Is a notoriously difficult area to find affordable practice space in. Is this true for you; where do you practice?

Troy: We practice at our drummer’s house. I've been lucky enough to have pretty steady practice spots in various band members’ houses for years now.

Alex: Which unfortunately is not the case for everyone. We are very fortunate to have a steady practice space.

How has the internet changed your DIY experience? For instance, you release 7 inches with other bands, both on vinyl and bandcamp; is it easier or harder to sell records? There is a lot of discussion about the “changing music industry” but it is mostly focused on the labels. How is DIY changing. How is hardcore changing, if at all?

Ian: Whether records are sold online, at a record store, or at a show, I don't think that fans of music are going to base their interest on a particular medium. However, I do feel that relevance is fleeting in the digital age due to the fact that the internet is sensory overload. I don't really consider DIY to be a specific genre, or scene, it's just a matter of people caring a enough about their art to put it on display. In terms of hardcore changing, it will always carry the message it is supposed to get across.

Troy: The internet has made it easier to get your music to people all over the world. It all depends on where you're playing, but people still buy records/merch at shows and online. Things like bandcamp have made it easier to sell merch even when you're not playing shows. Both are pretty necessary. Everything is always evolving/changing. We try to embrace it all.

 

 

 

will

 
 
 

 

Walk the Plank
Walk the Plank/Supreme Commander Split 7"

 

 
 
 

 

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