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Funk





Bye-Bye!

Dear Deli Philly Readers,

I’m a procrastinator by nature, and this is certainly a post that I’ve been procrastinating to write. When I first became involved with the Philly music community, I started with booking shows at various spaces and for local area acts. I remember coming out to a show in Brooklyn to support one of the local bands that I was helping out, and I was really interested in figuring out how I could connect similar-minded, up-and-coming NYC acts with the lesser known yet talented Philly artists that I was assisting. During that time, if you had heard of a touring act coming to your town, they were usually already a little too popular to really want to trade shows with any acts that they didn’t know personally and/or probably had never heard of. That was when I just happened to come across a print issue of the NYC Deli Magazine in a coffee shop. (I still probably have that copy somewhere because I’m a borderline hoarder.) It was exactly what I was looking for – a publication that was dedicated to giving exposure to interesting-sounding, indie/DIY acts that were still flying under the radar of the larger music blogs and news organizations.

I was instantly a fan of what The Deli was doing, so when I read that they were opening a Philadelphia branch, I was psyched to get involved. I have always been a bit of a music geek who spent way too much of his time listening to and discovering new music to make mixtapes, burn CD mixes, and create playlists for my friends. The Deli Philly just felt like a natural extension of what I had been doing most of my life. However, when I submitted my first post, I never imagined that I would be writing my final one over a decade later, which will unfortunately also be The Deli Philly’s last as well.

Running the Philadelphia site and helping to edit the NYC print magazine have truly been a joy to me and a labor of love, but as some of you may or may not know, I recently became a father, and I’ve been simply finding myself lately more interested in jamming on a toy cat synthesizer with my daughter and deejaying private dance parties for her than practically anything else in the world. So deciding to move on from what has been such an essential part of my life for over the last ten years or so was definitely a difficult decision, but it also became a much easier one. It just felt right.

I’d like to take this time to thank all those who have supported us over the years and those who have inspired us with your music, words, photos/graphics, and always much-appreciated kindness. Of course, extra special thanks go out to Deli Editor-in-Chief Paolo De Gregorio for his passion and genuine good nature, Michael Colavita, whom The Deli Philly could have never survived without for the last few years, Tedd Hazard for his creativity and humor, and all the wonderful writers and photographers who have contributed to The Deli Philly site. It’s been an honor to share your words and art. And finally, for those who might still be interested in what I’ve been listening to of late, you will soon be able to find interviews with some of my favorite musicians over at Delicious Audio. (That is after I take a much-needed vacation.)

Much Love to All,

Q.D. Tran





Soul Food Horns soar on high with the release of “Hot Air”


Prolific horn and production collective Soul Food Horns released the single “Hot Air” last Tuesday on Brooklynn based label Sundae Sauuce. Calculatedly relaxed, buoyant trumpet lines and synths float the groove above succinct drums and bass that have no business being as fat as they are. The perfectly titled track smoothly sweeps into your ears and nestles itself somewhere between J Dilla and Chet Baker. Allowing the listener to actively digest the textures or take a reflective backseat, the tune acts as if part of a prestige “Lo-Fi Beats to Study to” playlist   

 

Although meeting in Austin, co-founders Louk Cox and Ari Burns have respectively reestablished themselves in Amsterdam and Chicago. Current Austin-based members include Sam Howden, Dan Fears, and Noé Mina. They don’t let space decrease productivity however as each member has a home workstation that they use to record and exchange ideas to facilitate long distance collaboration. Having all received an academic background, an eclectic body of work has emerged, including but not limited to hip-hop, house, and neo-soul. This open-minded approach has left them in a position to follow their multi-genre interests wherever they may lead. 

    The collective began simply as a horn section playing diverse gigs, establishing musical intimacy, and recording for artists such as Netherfriends, Magna Carda, and Mathien. Falling deeper into the world of recording, SFH became enamored by the craft of production. This interest led them to begin to produce independently for themselves and others, notably on Austin-local rapper and poet Chucky Blk’s debut “A Prequel To” and the collaborative LP “Koi Pond” with Cloudchord. 

   

    “Hot Air” came about naturally as Mina was visiting Cox in Amsterdam. Setting up shop in a makeshift studio “in the attic of an old building in the center of the city,'' Cox recalls “making the beat with the idea of capturing the sound of the summer breeze coming through the window.” As that goal has been elegantly captured, make sure to check out their other Cloudchord collaboration Moon Fortune, the fresh Chucky Blk single “Get That”, and another Sundae Sauuce single in October. 

 

- Hayden Steckel

 

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Salami Rose Joe Louis’ Zdenka 2080, Uptown show

We’re pleased to announce that Oakland’s Salami Rose Joe Louis has a new album and it is an ear feast for anyone down to let go and drift off into the octave-melting abyss. Zdenka 2080 (out on Brainfeeder) has jazz and synth, whispering poetry (“Octagonal Room”); there’s warm space vibes and distorted R&B moments. Sit back and drift off and come see ‘em at The Uptown for their album release show. -Michelle Kicherer, Associate Editor





The Pendeltons' funky sweet “Running Away”

Oh man, we’re pleased to have found The Pendeltons' funky sweetness. What is going on with these keys, these snapping fingers, the harmonies? Solid goodness. Pendeltons (on Bastard Jazz) are perfect to jam with after a long day or at a start of a fresh one: they bring that shoulder moving, positive feeling that we appreciate. They’ve got that soul, boogie vibe while keeping that modern feel. Highly recommend. -Michelle Kicherer, Associate Editor





Funk

Time: 
08:00
Band name: 
SDMB
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/spacedonkeyandthemoonbouncers/
Venue name: 
Ortlieb's
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